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'Million Ways' a slapstick take on Westerns (w/video)

  • Amanda Seyfried, Neil Patrick Harris, Seth MacFarlane and Charlize Theron in a scene from "A Million Ways to Die in the West." (AP Photo/Universal Pictures)

LOS ANGELES — Seth MacFarlane might've picked a safer place to make his lead-acting debut than "A Million Ways to Die in the West," his directorial follow-up to 2012's surprisingly successful "Ted." The marketplace doesn't seem to be crying out for Westerns, after all — be they earnest revivals, satires, or genre hybrids involving extra-terrestrials — and the undeniably of-his-moment MacFarlane is, as the script indirectly admits, a strange fit for the genre. Stocking the supporting cast with top-drawer talent, he gives most of his co-stars little to do besides attract our attention on movie posters.

A winking mid-film cameo prompts viewers to wonder how MacFarlane might have fared playing a time-traveler from our era stranded in the Old West. Instead, his 1880s sheep farmer Albert Stark simply talks like someone born in and transplanted from the 20th century. "We live in a terrible place and time," Albert tells friends Edward (Giovanni Ribisi) and Ruth (Sarah Silverman), assessing his surroundings as if seeing medical and social realities through our eyes. There are too many ways to die out here, he laments — though most of the shock-violence gags the movie employs demonstrate the risks not of living in an age before modern medicine but of inhabiting a world whose authors aren't terribly gifted at slapstick.

Dumped by his longtime sweetheart Louise (Amanda Seyfried), Albert is about ready to leave town when he meets Anna (Charlize Theron), a newcomer who appreciates his gentle personality in a way locals don't. Perhaps that's because she's secretly betrothed to the meanest cuss in these parts, a bandit called Clinch (Liam Neeson), who has sent her here to hide out while he dodges the law for a spell.

(The preceding sentence contains more Western-ese than the entire script MacFarlane wrote with Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild, which dates itself instead with stuff like "oh, snap," ''oh no I did-uhnt," and "douche.")

While Albert frets about Louise's new romance with fancy-pants shopkeeper Foy (Neil Patrick Harris, whose vain moustache-tonic merchant is a reliable laugh-getter), Anna takes an inexplicable interest in helping him stand up for himself. Why? Though MacFarlane eventually demonstrates a knack for low-key flirty humor, Albert's appeal at the start of their friendship is hard to see. One assumes Anna knows how much money Ted will make in 130 or so years and wants to get in on the ground floor.

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