63°
Mostly cloudy
SAT
 70°
 45°
SUN
 75°
 45°
MON
 68°
 45°
TUE
 62°
 41°
WED
 69°
 44°

Jailed missionary's sister echoes apology to N. Korea

  • American missionary Kenneth Bae, right, leaves after speaking to reporters at Pyongyang Friendship Hospital in Pyongyang Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Kim Kwang Hyon)

SEATTLE — The sister of an American detained for more than a year in North Korea echoed her brother's apology to the nation for crimes he committed and his plea to the U.S. government to ramp up efforts to secure his release.

In a statement released Monday after Kenneth Bae gave a brief news conference in North Korea, Terri Chung of Edmonds, Wash., said, "We understand that Kenneth has been convicted of crimes under DPRK laws. Our family sincerely apologizes on Kenneth's behalf."

Chung's statement was a change in tone from previous times she's spoken of her brother in which she said he did nothing wrong and was legally working in North Korea as a tour operator.

Kim Jin Moo, a North Korea expert at the South Korean state-run Korea Institute for Defense Analyses in Seoul, said Bae's apology should be viewed in the context of the complex relationship between North Korea and the United States.

"We shouldn't take Kenneth Bae's comments merely as his own," Jin Moo said. "The reason why North Korea had Kenneth Bae make this statement ... is that they want Washington to reach out to them."

Chung said to North Korea's leaders: "We humbly ask for your mercy to release my brother." The family is concerned about Bae's health, and Chung said she could "see that he was distressed."

Bae was accused of subversive activities against the authoritarian government. Several years ago, Bae gave a sermon in which he advocated bringing Americans to North Korea for a mass prayer session to bring about the reunification of North and South Korea.

At the press conference Monday, Bae apologized and said he committed anti-government acts. He wore a gray cap and inmate's uniform with the number 103 on his chest and was under guard during the appearance. It is not unusual for prisoners in North Korea to say after their release that they spoke in similar situations under duress.

Bae pointed to a comment by U.S. Vice President Joe Biden last month as having made his situation more difficult

comments powered by Disqus
© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View