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Leonardo DiCaprio good and loathsome in 'Wall Street' movie

  • Leonardo DiCaprio as Jordan Belfort in a scene from "The Wolf of Wall Street."(AP Photo/Paramount Pictures, Mary Cybulski)

Leonardo DiCaprio's most charismatic performance ever anchors Martin Scorsese's robust and raunchy lowlifes-of-high-finance comedy “The Wolf of Wall Street.” This is their greatest teaming, a veritable “Citizen Kane” of the post-“greed is good” era — three hours of cocaine and orgies and high-living by the sorts of gauche gamblers who brought that age, and the world economy, to its knees.

It is Scorsese's “La Dolce Vita,” a manic, coke-fueled stock market “Goodfellas” following the rise and epic fall of a crook. All that's missing are the victims, and the outrage.

DiCaprio is Jordan Belfort, an eager-beaver young broker-in-training who takes the mesmerizing patter from his drugs, sex and making-money mentor Mark Hanna (Matthew McConaughey) to heart. The name of the game, Hanna purrs, is “moving the money from the client's pocket to your pocket.”

A light goes off in idealistic Jordan's head. Who cares if the client does well? It's all about your commissions, your shady deals, getting rich because “money makes you a better person.”

A light goes off in the viewer's head, too. Before anybody starts stamping DiCaprio's name on the Oscar, here's old Matthew to remind us that nobody has had a better year acting in the movies — nobody. If Mark Hanna had more than two scenes, McConaughey might have stolen the movie.

But this isn't Oliver Stone's preachy, good-man-falls-far opera “Wall Street.” This is about Jordan's layoff during the financial crash of 1987 and his rebirth as a penny stocks-trading bottom feeder, the sort of smooth, money-printing huckster who lures proteges and followers like a revival preacher.

Donnie (Jonah Hill) is the first. Assorted other “guys from the neighborhood” follow.

That's the genius of this. The savvier Wall Street pundits noticed how brokers, traders and derivatives specialists went from making a very good living in the early Reagan years to making obscene amounts of money by the end of the Reagan years.

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