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Viticulture briefs

Master Sommelier David Glancy, founder of San Francisco Wine School, will host the “California Wine Appellation Specialist 3-Day Credential Program.”

The program will focus on the increasingly complex landscape of American Viticultural Areas.

The event, which costs $1,500 or $1,650, will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily from Jan. 31 to Feb. 2 at the Hyatt Vineyard Creek Hotel and Spa in Santa Rosa.

Glancy developed the California Wine Appellation Specialist program and exam in January 2012.

For information, visit www.sanfranciscowineschool.com or contact Kristin Campbell at kcampbell@sfwineschool.com or 415-779-2397.

Rack & Riddle expands

Rack & Riddle Custom Wine Services announced it has signed a lease to expand its operations into Murphy Family Winery.

The lease of the Murphy Winery, which contains 50,000 square feet of space, combined with the company’s October lease of 67,000 square feet of space in Healdsburg, brings the company’s expanded presence in Sonoma County to some 117,000 square feet in just two months.

“We placed a high premium on finding a tenant that would uphold the many expectations we have in the use of our winery,” said Jim Murphy of Murphy Family Winery in a news release.

Rack & Riddle will assume responsibility for operating the Alexander Valley facility on Jan. 1, according to a news release.

SLO free of sharpshooter

San Luis Obispo County is now free of a pest that has been the scourge of the wine grape industry.

Agricultural officials have declared the glassy-winged sharpshooter eradicated in the Central Coast county. The announcement comes three years after the pest was first found in a San Luis Obispo neighborhood.

A prevention effort was launched and the pest did not spread to nearby vineyards.

The insect can transmit bacteria responsible for plant diseases, including Pierce’s disease, which is fatal to grapevines.

California’s first major infestation occurred in Temecula in Riverside County in 1999, where more than 300 acres of vineyards were destroyed.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. Compiled by Cathy Bussewitz. You can send items to cathy.bussewitz@pressdemocrat.com.

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