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Krugman: Obama can make progress on inequality

  • President Barack Obama speaking last week on growing income inequality in the United States. (EVAN VUCCI / Associated Press)

Much of the media commentary on President Barack Obama's big inequality speech was cynical. You know the drill: It's yet another “reboot” that will go nowhere; none of it will have any effect on policy, and so on. But before we talk about the speech's possible political impact or lack thereof, shouldn't we look at the substance? Was what the president said true? Was it new? If the answer to these questions is yes — and it is — then what he said deserves a serious hearing.

And once you realize that, you also realize that the speech may matter a lot more than the cynics imagine.

First, about those truths: Obama laid out a disturbing — and, unfortunately, all too accurate — vision of an America losing touch with its own ideals, an erstwhile land of opportunity becoming a class-ridden society. Not only do we have an ever-growing gap between a wealthy minority and the rest of the nation; we also, he declared, have declining mobility, as it becomes harder and harder for the poor and even the middle class to move up the economic ladder. And he linked rising inequality with falling mobility, asserting that Horatio Alger stories were becoming rare precisely because the rich and the rest were now so far apart.

This isn't entirely new terrain for Obama. What struck me about this speech, however, was what he had to say about the sources of rising inequality. Much of our political and pundit class remains devoted to the notion that rising inequality, to the extent that it's an issue at all, is all about workers lacking the right skills and education. But the president now seems to accept progressive arguments that education is at best one of a number of concerns, that America's growing class inequality largely reflects political choices, like the failure to raise the minimum wage along with inflation and productivity.

And because the president was willing to assign much of the blame for rising inequality to bad policy, he was also more forthcoming than in the past about ways to change the nation's trajectory, including a rise in the minimum wage, restoring labor's bargaining power, and strengthening, not weakening, the safety net.

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