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Sloppy Silicon Valley techies find their style

  • Peak Design founder Peter Dering looks through a package of clothing he had received from Buck Mason at his office in San Francisco, Monday, Sept. 30, 2013. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

SAN JOSE — The Silicon Valley has had a men's fashion problem dating back to its founders.

From their inception, tech companies went out of their way to be different — and that meant no more business suits. Thus brilliant innovations took place in the dumpiest of outfits as leather sandals, elastic-waist jeans and old T-shirts became ubiquitous.

But that's changing as a younger generation of engineers and designers have arrived seeking clothes that coordinate.

"There's definitely a shift happening here, and the age of the Silicon Valley culture has something to do with it," said image professional Joseph Rosenfeld.

"As a generation," he said, young professionals "tend to care more about style than engineers of the past."

The market has responded to this new attitude among the region's rising nerds, geeks and hackers with new online men's stores, personal style consultants and an array of high-end shops at Northern California's biggest mall. They're catering to the emerging members of a creative industry who, nonetheless, are seeking something of a uniform.

"They'll typically wear designer denim and a great button-up shirt by day, and throw on a sport coat at night to go to a cigar or wine bar," said Westfield Valley Fair mall general manager Matt Ehrie. "Silicon Valley's dressy attire would be casual Friday in most other parts of the country."

Josh Meyer, 30, a products manager at a leading high-tech firm, recognizes the generation gap. He said higher-level managers who have been in the industry for decades often wear baggy khakis and faded baseball shirts "like they're going to a barbeque," while millennials such as himself like to wear button-up dress shirts "high-quality denim jeans with a roll at the bottom, nice shoes or possibly boots."

"I can pick out techies just walking down the street by these outfits," he said.

The focus on men's fashion has emerged in a sector where 3 of 4 workers are males. And it's come late by comparison as women in technology have long faced style challenges.

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