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Finding good jobs an uphill climb for millennial generation

  • First-year clinic coordinator Cindy Fleckner, left, shows dental hygiene students Jennifer de'Lavigne and Tais Dasilva how to use a tool during class at Santa Rosa Junior College on Friday, Sept. 6, 2013. (Christopher Chung / The Press Democrat)

Jessica Beristianos feels like she won the lottery.

Not the California Lottery; the 21-year-old from Upper Lake doesn't have a check for millions of dollars.

But she has, nonetheless, the ticket to an almost certain job making $35 to $55 an hour, enough to raise a future family while working part-time.

“I'm lucky,” she said Friday, wearing a white lab coat over teal scrubs in the Dental Hygiene Clinic at Santa Rosa Junior College. “It's exciting to think of what you can do when you get out.”

Beristianos and the other 23 first-year students in SRJC's dental hygiene program are bound for secure employment, something missing for many of their 82 million peers in the age group known as millennials.

They all got in by virtue of an admissions lottery: A random selection of 24 students from a field of 57 qualified applicants.

Unemployment among millennials age 18 to 29 was 11.8 percent in August, more than 60 percent higher than the national jobless rate of 7.3 percent, according to Generation Opportunity, a national youth advocacy organization.

Counting those who are no longer looking for work, the jobless rate for millennials was 16 percent, compared with 13.6 percent nationally.

Sonoma County's overall jobless rate was 7.1 percent in July, compared to a statewide rate of 9.3 percent, with no breakout for millennials nor August rates available.

Millennials, generally born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s, are mired in an economy slowly rebounding from the severe recession of 2008, which erased 8.8 million jobs.

They also are victims of technology, which is eliminating entry-level jobs, and the tendency of baby boomers — their parents — to postpone retirement, said Robert Eyler, a Sonoma State University economist.

For many boomers, the decision to hold onto their jobs stemmed from a dramatic loss of home equity caused by the housing meltdown, he said.

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