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McManus: At war within the GOP

  • (NANCY OHANIAN / Tribune Media Services)

We’ve all grown used to a Congress locked in bitter warfare between two parties, producing gridlock on federal spending and other pressing issues. But the Congress that left Washington last week hit a new high in another category: gridlock among Republicans.

Take last week’s unremarkable proposal by President Barack Obama for a deal to combine corporate tax cuts (an idea Republicans love) with an increase in spending on roads and other public works (an idea only some Republicans love).

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who has emerged as Obama’s chief partner in trying to negotiate bipartisan deals, praised the idea as “a good start.” Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., the Senate Republican leader, denounced it as a trick to boost government spending. Meanwhile, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, a leader of the up-and-coming tea party faction, said Republicans should stop talking about any deals and threaten to shut down the federal government instead.

And that was only in the Senate. In the House, where Republicans run the chamber, the chaos was even worse. When House leaders tried to pass exactly the sort of deep cuts in transportation and housing programs they’ve been calling for, they suddenly discovered that they didn’t have a majority; some GOP members thought the cuts were too deep, and others thought they weren’t deep enough.

How divided are Republicans in Congress? So divided, one conservative joked, that it shouldn’t be called a civil war: “It’s not organized enough for that.”

The Republicans are divided over how much to cut federal spending and how fast. McCain and his “Gang of Eight” GOP senators are negotiating with Obama on a bargain that could include new spending on jobs in the short run in exchange for cuts in Medicare and other programs in the long run. To tea party Republicans like Cruz, that’s anathema.

The GOP is also divided on how to fight the implementation of Obama’s health care law, which begins signing up clients Oct. 1. Cruz and Sens. Mike Lee of Utah, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Marco Rubio of Florida have launched a tea-party-fueled crusade to block any spending bill — and thus shut down the federal government — unless Obamacare is defunded. But most Republicans, including conservative stalwart Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, think that’s a terrible idea. Not only would it probably fail to stop Obamacare, it could also draw the wrath of voters, who would blame the GOP for an unnecessary crisis.

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