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Neighbors sue Santa Rosa over asphalt plant silos

  • Bodean Company plant operator Anthony Boyle runs the batch plant from the control room on Monday, April 23, 2012. (Christopher Chung / PD)

Santa Rosa is being sued for allowing an asphalt plant to add three massive storage silos without requiring a report analyzing the environmental impacts.

Citizens for Safe Neighborhoods filed its suit in Sonoma County Superior Court last month challenging the City Council's approval June 19 of a permit for the Bodean Company project.

The group, made up mostly of residents who live in the West End neighborhood near the Maxwell Drive plant, claims the city twisted local zoning and environmental rules to approve the project.

It's asking the court to void the permit and require an environmental impact report.

"We have an issue with a company expanding a non-conforming use that's surrounded by homes, families, schools and parks," said Allen Thomas, a resident of the West End Neighborhood and Historic District and former city planning commissioner.

At the heart of the debate is whether the three proposed 82-foot silos and related equipment represent an expansion of the use on the 6.5-acre site, which has been used for similar activities since the 1950s.

Bodean claims the $1.5 million project won't increase the production capacity, but would help it operate more efficiently.

Critics note the company's application for a new permit from the Bay Area Regional Air Quality Management District proposes an annual production limit of 759,000 tons, which they call a threefold increase over 2011 levels.

City staff recommended approval of the permit largely because the silos don't actually allow the plant to produce any more asphalt, just store more of it. The heart of the operation, the batch plant, still will be able to produce only about 300 tons per hour.

Because the production capacity won't be increasing, city staff concluded that other impacts such as noise, dust and traffic weren't likely to increase, either. It found that the new equipment would allow the plant to operate more efficiently, thereby reducing energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and other neighborhood impacts.

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